Tag Archives: dilapidations

Dilapidations Lancashire-200000 sq ft Warehouse Scheduled and Condition Recorded- Future Claim Defence

200000 sq ft Warehouse Roof Complex

I have recently prepared Ingoing Tenant’s Schedule of Condition for manufacturing Client who has taken 200000sq ft warehouse/factory unit in Lancashire. This comprised a comprehensive  written Schedule, 100’s 0f digital photographs and high definition AVCHD Video.

The commission involved using a 22m rise 12m outreach access platform to enable the roof to be photographed and inspected. The usual problems were present- cut edge and spot corrosion, colour fade, grp roof-lights weathered and degraded to opacity, corroding valley gutters and the usual carrion debris and soiling.

The Schedule and Executive Summary advice I provided enabled the prospective Tenant to evaluate it potential liabilities and seek to limit the same.

No sustainable large claims at Lease end for this Tenant.

The project was turned round in  a week.

‘All received safe & sound Andy, thanks very much for fast & efficient service. Regards TB Director’

WOW (Words of  Wisdom)

Always, always commission an Ingoing Tenant’s Schedule of Condition before Lease to enable you to limit your liabilities, or negotiate repairs and decorations before lease, or a rent free period to reflect cost of same or simply exclude where functionality and weather exclusion are not issues.

An Ingoing Tenant's Schedule of Condition is priceless- limit your liabilities!! You will be glad you invested in one especially at lease end.
Dilapidations North West, Dilapidations Lancashire. Dilapidations Surveyor,Dilapidations Schedule of Conditio
Dilapidations Experts- Defend and Claim
Advertisements

Dilapidations Lancashire- £180000 claim settled at £40000

Recognise your lease liabilities in good time.

A client approached me towards the end of 2009 with a dilapidations claim from a Landlord for £180000 or thereabouts in respect of an industrial warehouse. There was only a month or so  left of the lease. I asked why the Tenant had left it so late to deal with the matter. The Tenant thought because it had heard nothing from the Landlord with couple of months to go, it was going to get away without claim. There had been an Ingoing Tenant’s Schedule of Condition and the lease liabilities were limited to yielding up in no better or worse condition than the state of repair at time of lease.

Other than move out and remove fixtures and fittings the Tenant had done virtually nothing to put its house in order in respect of repairs and decorations.

I  was engaged to see what I could do. An analysis of the Lease and Claim revealed there were the usual invalid items and overstated costs; liability for some repair items was relieved by the Schedule ; a lot of the repair and decorations  items were however valid. I prepared a schedule of works so the client could attempt to complete the same before lease end including repainting a substantial concrete floor and various other simple works of repair and cleaning.The Tenant was engaged in relative modest expenditure in comparison with the original costed claim items.

After vacation and lease end ,the Landlord’s surveyor revised the Landlord’s claim downwards to £95000. After six months of negotiation and haggling with the Landlord’s Surveyor, the Landlord eventually settled for £40000.

A satisfactory result for the Tenant.

WOW  (Words of Wisdom)

Do not assume because your Landlord has not served a Schedule of Dilapidations you will escape liability from Lease  covenants for Repairing, Decorating and Reinstatement.

Plan backwards and put your house in order, unless of course you know for certain the premises are to be substantially altered or demolished rendering any such works valueless. ( Law of Supersession).

Oh and if a warehouse concrete floor slab is not painted at the beginning of lease be aware painting it could substantially extend your decorating liabilities at lease end.

Dilapidations Lancashire-When to keep means to put. Rough waters ahead.

Rough waters ahead for ignorant tenants.

Sadly many commercial Tenants are ignorant of what their lease terms mean. If for one moment someone explains clearly  the innocuous phrase ‘to keep’ in repair means implicitly to ‘put into repair‘ that deal on cheap lease in a  leaky Victorian north-light factory does not seem so good. ‘To keep‘ means to put your hands into your own pockets and spend hard earned cash on putting the premises in repair.Great for the Landlord. Not so great for the Tenant.

To keep in repair?

Oh and do not think you can fold the Company to escape liability- most leases require the old PG–  the personal guarantee from Directors or others.

WOW (Words of Wisdom)

Always take professional advice from a Chartered Building Surveyor before Lease who can work with your Solicitor to ensure you do not unwittingly sign up to an onerous and costly burden. You now know it makes sense.


Dilapidations Northwest- Leading solicitors Weightmans tell it as it is in their Commercial Property Focus newsletter

A Poor State of Affairs

The Rise of Dilapidation Claims

Matthew Williamson says in Weightmans newsletter :

“Over the past couple of years, the number of dilapidation claims served by landlords against tenants has risen dramatically. Dilapidations are the tenant’s cost of reinstating a property back to the condition required by the lease. Claims have increased because the recession has limited the redevelopment of commercial premises; in a stronger market landlords may just demolish premises that were in a state of disrepair, now they are forced to spend money repairing and redecorating and want to claim that money back from their tenant…………..”

Matthew Williamson is an associate in the commercial property team at law firm WeightmansLLP     

Full article can be found by clicking below. All rights reserved.

Commercial Property Focus 2009


Dilapidations Lancashire- A video is worth 10000 words 500 digital photos and a wedge of money saved.

I come across from time to time poor and impoverished Schedules of Condition prepared on behalf of ingoing Tenants comprising pretty basic and limited written schedules and  photographs.-an attempt to limit the Tenant’s liabilities to a condition no better or worse than recorded at the time of Lease was the probable brief. Gosh these must have been prepared  years ago before digital camera technology I hear you say. Often yes , but  I have had to try to defend terminal dilapidations claims on basis of schedules prepared as little as 5 years ago meeting this description. It is hard work as it seems the object of dispute is always just outside the field of view of the photograph. Sod’s law. I can interpolate a lot from overall state of repair and decoration shown on a series of photographs but there is nothing better than a comprehensive visual record which leaves no room for arguements between Surveyors often many years down the line. Digital photography technology allows us now to take hundreds of photographs and store them on  SD cards or similar cards the size of a postage stamp or DVD disc . ( CDs very rarely these days have enough space to store sufficient high-resolution photos).

Even hundreds of photographs might not be enough. To address this issue we have adopted and use the best of technology to now prepare definitive Schedules of Condition comprising comprehensive written descriptions of defects, cross referenced high resolution photos ( minimum 9MP) and High Definition Video  (AVCHD) . A HD video is priceless for recording complex defects and conveying the condition. Run on your common place HD TV on say a 42″ screen the HD video reveals all. I started last year when faced with prospect of recording condition of 4.5 acre industrial site of complex buildings of many varied types. It worked and I provided multiple DVDs ( about 2.5 hours of video )to compliment digital photos and written schedules. No arguements in 10 years time at lease end.Period.  Sony  or other commonly available Blue-Ray players or even Sony ps3 play the discs beautifully.

I have now adopted the procedure for more modest commissions. Why accept anything less? OK it costs extra in time and effort and cost but the definitive record is priceless to resist overstated dilapidations claims at lease end. My aim is to make it as far as impossible  to pursue a legitimate claim for disrepair where limitation as to condition at time of lease is of essence.No system or approach is perfect but my clients will always be assured I shall continue to strive to perfect my method using the best of technology available.

They may not know it for 5 or 10 years but they will reap the benefit .

Seemples?

WOW  (Words of wisdom)

Limit your liabilities by definitive ingoing Tenant’s schedule of condition.

HD video is an invaluable part of such schedule.

You know where to come.



Dilapidations Lancashire-Terminal Claim for £100500 managed down to £2400!

Facing a big claim?
Facing a big claim?

A Tenant client of mine rang Jones & Co from his newly acquired position standing on a window ledge facing the prospect of a self- propelled precipice drop.

‘I have received a Terminal Schedule of Dilapidations claim for £100500! We have only occupied the premises for 5 years and now this bombshell…what can we do?’

I duly took instruction  calmed him down and helped the distraught Tenant step back from the window ledge .

I conducted a review of the Claim which included an inspection of the premises and detailed examination of the Lease. The Tenant was indeed bound by fairly standard lease with liabilities to keep the premises in repair, redecorate in the last three months of the lease and not to have made any alterations without consent.

The Tenant had unfortunately not been advised before Lease to have a Surveyor prepare an Ingoing Tenant’s Schedule of Condition . This would have served two purposes : to ascertain condition and for attachment to Lease to limit liabilities to keeping the premises in no better or worse condition. The operative words in the repairing clause ‘to keep’ meant that where the premises were already in disrepair the tenant would assume liability to put into repair. A common and often very expensive mistake.

‘Not fair’ I hear the cry so many times. Well you are a big boy or girl and you are entering into a legal commercial contract so why did you not take the best legal and surveying advice at the outset?

This Tenant fortunately contacted Jones and Co with a couple of months left in the lease and there was just enough time for action. The review of the claim revealed a fair number of item requirements for repair were indeed potential legitimate claims.  I was however in disagreement with a significant number of items which I considered either outside the scope of the lease requirements and were not the Tenant’s liability or were simply overstated. eg Replace rooflights £10000when a clean and reseal would suffice. Replace colour coated metal barge boards £5000 when  a repaint only was necessary. You get the picture.

I prepared a  formal Review of the Claim and identified legitimate liabilities and matters to address. Doubtful items were identified and I suggested these items were worth arguing. I recommended a strategy and response. Acting on the advice the Tenant determined to effect works of repair and decoration and reinstatement to mitigate his own exposure to the potential dilapidations claim.I prepared a Schedule of works I considered he should address . He took control of costs and with professional advice carried out works of repair and redecoration which were considered reasonably required by the Lease and not all those required by the Landlord’s Surveyor. Upon vacation of the premises I prepared a full Photographic Schedule of Condition recording the condition. Always do this as it can save arguements later as it indeed did.

The premises looked pretty smart at lease end and all credit to the outgoing Tenant  a good job had been done and fair amount of money spent but nothing like the amount of the potential claim! There was nothing prejudicial about the vacated condition which might be offputting to a potential new Tenant- which is of course dear to any Landlord’s heart and wallet.

'Left pretty smart upon vacation.'
'Left pretty smart upon vacation.'

Congratulations all round you would think? Effusive thanks from Landlord? No. A revised Claim  for £25400 only.

‘Hell fire or f*** me ‘ as actually uttered by the ex- Tenant! Understanadble.

My client duly contacted me and requested I negotiate settlement which I duly did. The majority of the items still claimed were challenged and argued against.The claim was reduced to £20500 but they would ‘settle for £10000 ‘( getting desperate). I considered £1750 plus VAT equivalent was fair and reasonable ( being majority Landlord’s Surveyors fees for the merry dance we all had enjoyed)

Well suffice it to say the matter was finally settled at around £2400. Result!

WOW (Words of Wisdom)

A small industrial unit- a big dilapidations claim
A small industrial unit- a big dilapidations claim

1. Always take best experienced and informed professional legal and surveyor’s advice before lease

2. Always commission an ingoing tenant’s Schedule of Condition (and do not forget all engineering services.)

3. Always negotiate repair and decorations liabilities. Spell out just exactly what you are prepared to take on and expressly exclude all matters you are not.

4.Keep your house in order and do what you have contracted to do in respect of repair and redecoration.

5.Take control of costs and plan backwards from lease end date and allow sufficient time to put the house in order. Take advice from your Surveyor as to strategy .

6.Always seek advice when you receive  a Repairs Notice or Schedule of Dilapidations. The Landlord’s Surveyor’s requirements may not properly reflect the actual liabilities.

Dilapidations Lancashire- Landlords and Tenants do not get floored by claims or losses at lease end!

Dilapidations Lancashire,dilapidations expert

A constant source of arguement between Landlord and Tenant (and their Surveyors )at lease end is about carpets and other floor coverings. Do they fall under the Repairing covenant? Are they loose or fixed . Are they glue fixed or on gripper rods? Who put them in?

When is a carpet in repair any way?  If you walk across a carpet lots of  times it will inevitably wear. Put desks and furnitute on top of carpet and it will indent. Sunlight streaming in through windows will cause fading. Spill coffee tea ink toner etc and it will become soiled. Walk in with dirty shoes and you will get grimy footpath trails associated with personnel traffic through the premises.

Ok so the tenant tries cleaning the carpets. They may be cleaner but what about the fade patches and uneven wear associated with wheely chairs and foot tapping staff at desk positions?

At the outset of the lease consider the issue of floor coverings and set down precisely how carpets and floor coverings are to be dealt with at lease end.

Landlords if you want all floor coverings renewed at lease end expressely say so at the outset and record in the lease.  Specify the type and quality.Do not hope the repairing covenant will cover. Why should you provide new coverings and let someone abuse them- the floor coverings are a diminishing assest anyway.  Fact- they will soil and wear and fade. Period.

Tenants if you do not want to renew floor coverings at the lease end or pay for them expressely say so at the outset and record in the lease. Do not take premises with pre-existing shag (ged) carpets and floor finishes and sign up to repair covenant to keep in repair because you can not keep in repair a worn or faded carpet or sheet vinyl floor.. You will inevitably face claim for new floor coverings.

Both parties to the lease should carefully determine at the outset their respective positions and expectations about future liabilities for floor coverings and expressely agree and record how they will be dealt with at lease end – include a specific paragraph in the lease. -something like  ‘the Tenant will at before lease end renew all carpets and vinyl floor coverings or pay to the landlord the costs of the same at lease end.’ or ‘the tenant will have all carpets and other floor coverings cleaned in last 3 months before lease end or pay to the landlord the costs of the same at lease end but will be under no obligation to replace any floor coverings.’

dilapidations lancashire, dilapidations expert

WOW ( words of wisdom)

Landlords and Tenants should determine how floor finishes will be dealt with at lease end and agree liabilities and expressely set out in lease.

Leave nothing to interpretation in years down the line. Save ££££££ in claims or losses.